Archive for April, 2008

Dirty Girls book party with free boob cake TONIGHT!

April 10, 2008

I’m having a super fun, free book party tonight, April 10th, for my brand-new anthology with 27 HOT stories, Dirty Girls: Erotica for Women, from 7 – 9 pm in NYC at Sutra Lounge, 16 First Avenue off First Street, Free

There will be boob cake to honor the nipple on the book’s cover from Moist and Tasty, readings by me (Rachel Kramer Bussel) and contributors Tsaurah Litzky, Sofia Quintero, Lillian Ann Slugocki and Suki Bishop. Plus drink specials and books for sale!

See you there! If you can’t make it, the book is available for sale on Amazon or directly from me, autographed, $14 including shipping (U.S.), email me for details.

Dirty Girls virtual book tour dates

April 8, 2008

I’ve been remiss in posting about the Dirty Girls: Erotica for Women virtual book tour, which will be going on throughout April, I’m sorting out the 2nd half of the month now and will update this post with that info. Also, the book party with free boob cake (also by Moist and Tasty, who made the boob cooies below) is this Thursday, April 10th, 7-9, free at Sutra Lounge, 16 First Avenue off First Street, NYC. 21+ – please join us!

Boob cookies

April 2008 Dirty Girls virtual book tour

1 Viviane’s Sex Carnival
2 Seska 4 lovers
3 Interview by Javacia Harris at Velocity Weekly and Erotica Writing Tips
4 Excerpt at Bliss Warrior
5 on vacation
6 Bad Advice/Judy McGuire
7 Guest Post at Lust Bites
8 20 Questions at Hot Movies for Her
9 Deborah Siegel/Girl With Pen
10 Babeland
11 NYC Urban Gypsy
12 Funky Brown Chick
13 Boinkology
14 Video interview by Audacia Ray at Live Girl Review
15 Pretty Dumb Things
16 Enchantments (Andrea Dale)
17 Lusty Lady
18 The Year of the Books (Shanna Germain)
19 on vacation
20 on vacation
21 Read in Bed! (Megan Hart)
22 The Principles of Pleasure
23 Trollop With a Laptop (Alison Tyler)
24 Baser Instincts
25 Mint Jelly
26
27
28
29 Being Amber Rhea
30

Interview with Lillian Ann Slugocki

April 8, 2008

fyi – I’m not sure why the interview with Lillian isn’t loading – am working on it!

Here’s the latest of the Dirty Girls: Erotica for Women contributor interviews.

Lillian will read from her story “Truck Stop Cinderella” at the free book party this Thursday, April 10th, 7-9 pm, at Sutra Lounge, 16 First Avenue off First Street, NYC. Please join us for readings, boob cake, drink specials and lots of fun!

Lillian Ann Slugocki, an award-winning feminist writer, has created a body of work on women and their sexuality that includes fiction, nonfiction, plays, and monologues that have been produced on Broadway, Off Broadway, Off Off Broadway and on National Public Radio. Her work has been published in books, in journals, in anthologies, and online, including on Salon.com. She has been reviewed in The New York Times, The Village Voice, Art in America, The New Yorker, The Daily News, and the New York Post; and recently in London, in Time Out, The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph, and The London Sunday Times.

Tell us a little about yourself, aside from what’s in your official bio.

I just finished a Master’s Degree at NYU at The Gallatin School which was a huge eye opening experience for me. As a guerrilla feminist producing radio and theatre in the 1990’s in New York City, it was illuminating to read what other feminist writers and critics had to say about storytelling, about female protagonists, about what our limitations were and what we were up against. In other words, I had the instinct and the intuition, but the formal education gave it a broader platform and helped placed it in a feminist historical context.

What inspired your story “Truck Stop Cinderella?” What do you hope people take way from it?

I see Gracie Angelique DuBois [the protagonist of “Truck Stop Cinderella”] as a proto-feminist, one of the first models coming off the assembly line in the early 1970’s. She is acutely aware of the power of her sexuality, and isn’t afraid to use it to her advantage. Unlike the classical story of Cinderella, which I see as a model of passive femininity, Gracie has agency and power because she also takes pride in the money she makes, her own money — which brings autonomy and freedom. When Prince Charming comes into her life as the mysterious handsome man, he rocks her world, yes, but in truth, she is already well on her way to becoming her own woman. She’s not waiting to be rescued, she is rescuing herself. Her goal is not a husband, but escape. This is what I love about her, along with her bouffant hair-do and her baby blue 1971 convertible.

This story is part of a series you’re doing retelling fairy tales in the form of erotica. Can you tell us more about this project and how the two are linked? Do you think there are already sexual elements to the common fairy tales?

This series, called, She Who Goes Mad: A Collection of Erotic Feminist Fairy Tales is part of the ongoing feminist desire to “re-write” our myths. Cinderella, and The Little Mermaid, and Snow White, to name just a few, perpetuate the idea of submissive female protagonists. The strong women, like the Evil Step-Mother in Snow White are diabolical; the witch or the bitch. My role model for this is Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber. Like her, I borrow many of the conventions of fairy tales, but the narratives are amplified beyond these static boundaries with erotica. The heroines now have agency, they are empowered, exhibit Eros. I do believe that power is there, has always been there, but it’s been hidden or repressed.

Your stories also are markedly feminist, and make statements about class, gender roles, and sexism. How are erotica and feminism intertwined for you? How can they complement each other?

Anytime a woman takes it upon herself to write her story, it is a feminist action. Anytime a woman decides that she is subject, not object, that is a feminist action. I decided in the mid 1990’s to take objectified feminine sexuality, which I saw on the cover of almost every magazine across the city, and make it personal, to define for myself what its like to be sexual and female. To become subject, not object. Coming of age in the 1970’s, the ideal woman and what made her sexy — these definitions came from the male paradigm. I think writing erotica is an ideal way for a woman artist to proclaim her freedom from “the male gaze” and define for herself what it means to be a woman.

What’s your general erotica-writing process like? Do you write on a set schedule or when you’re inspired?

Truthfully I’m always thinking; what can I subvert? What is axiomatic in our culture, regarding women, and how can I change it up? How can I offer an alternate view? “Mary Magdalene,” a monologue for The Erotica Project re-imagines one of the greatest whores in history as a strong and intelligent, sexual woman who deeply loves her man, who just happens to be Jesus Christ. I was publicly denounced by the Catholic League when the monologue was published on Salon.com who called it blasphemous. That was a very proud moment for me–religion and mythology have been male dominated for so long, and I was thrilled to have ruffled some feathers.

What do you think makes a good erotica story work?

I think the protagonist has to be a three dimensional woman with a story to tell. She has to be a complex woman with psychological and emotional depth who is on a journey, and the vehicle for that journey is her sexuality. I think women read erotica differently than men read it. I think we read it as validation for being sexual beings, who enjoy and revel in the erotic, who can choose the form of that expression–we don’t have to be the whore or the witch, we don’t have to worry about being denounced, we can just be who we are. If that joy and that freedom and that complexity are all present in erotica, written by women, it will be, I believe, a good story.

You’ve worked in different genres and storytelling styles. How is writing erotica different or similar to your other work?

Writing erotica is fulfilling to me as a feminist artist because it is always political and always deeply personal. Before I wrote erotica, I wrote a great deal about the women burned as witches in the 17th century. I had this idea in my head that I could try and resurrect their voices, because they were lost to our traditional historical narrative. It was thrilling to work with primary source materials; the letters they wrote, their trial transcripts and try to, again, re-imagine them as strong women stuck in a very bad time. Their biggest crime, according to their persecutors, was their gender, their deviant devilish sexuality. So now in retrospect it’s not surprising that I would turn my attention to women and their devilish, deviant sexuality in the contemporary world.

What are you working on next?

I’m finishing up a novel, The Blue Mountains: A Metaphysical Love Story, which takes place over several centuries. It contains all my usual obsessions” sexuality, history, strong women. Angelique, a witch in the 12th century, curses her lover for betraying her and that curse remains with her and her lover over the course of eight hundred years. I’m also working on a film project called 10 One Night Stands–a series of short films that depict one night stands, in all their eroticism, but also examines the changed dynamics of the relationships between men and women in the 21st century. These are very comic and I hope deliciously sexy, but also very subversive. They are meant to make the audience squirm a bit in their seats. One story in particular is about a rape fantasy between a husband and wife. The wife is sick of being the “victim” and wants to be the rapist. He tells her, “No way baby, I can’t get it up for that.” And she tells him that he had better try.

The Dirty Girls book tour continues

April 7, 2008

My apologies for neglecting the awesome Dirty Girls: Erotica for Women virtual book tour. I’ll have more links later, but for now, check out my guest post over at Lust Bites, here’s a snippet:

What I like best about it is that it represents so many stages of women’s lives. I think that even those who have been with the same partner their whole lives still have fantasies about, say, sex with strangers or peep shows or orgies, and erotica, as many of you certainly know, is a brilliant way to tease out those fantasies. It lets women know they’re not alone and hopefully the more erotica that’s out there, the more women will be encouraged to pick up a pen and start writing.

I know for me, some of my best and most intense sexual experiences have been enhanced by writing about them later. Though currently most of my stories are fictional, those early autobiographical stories helped me figure out who I was sexually and which moments were the most meaningful. I was able to reshape and recast them and once I’d published them, learn about what other people had gone through, and I think this book will cause similar moments of self-identification.

And of course I’ll remind you again, but the book party is this Thursday, April 10th, FREE, with a boob cake, drink specials, and readings by me, Tsaurah Litzky, Sofia Quintero, Lillian Ann Slugocki and Suki Bishop from 7-9 at Sutra Lounge, 16 First Avenue (off First Street), 21+

The Dirty Girls virtual book tour kicks off!

April 2, 2008

Viviane’s Sex Carnival kicks off Day 1 of my virtual book tour for Dirty Girls today with an excerpt from my story “Icy Hot,” about a woman, a man, a hot day and the last bag of ice in the bodega. Check back here every day for more excerpts, reviews, and interviews about the book.